Category Archives: Wisdom

Dare to dream: Life equals risks

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Starting Over: Paul McCartney battled depression after the break-up of the Beatles

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Beatles

Success means having the courage, the determination, and the will to become the person you believe you were meant to be.” -George Sheehan

Determination to be successful, despite setbacks 

The cost of success is firm resolution, dedication to the job at hand, and the determination that you will win no matter the outcome. You have to apply the best of yourself to the challenge. Everyone must choose the path that they will walk. Failure is taking the path that everyone else does; success is making your own path. Success is determined by how resolute you are to succeed. Everyone experiences tough times. It is a measure of your determination and dedication, how you deal with them and finally come through them. You will always be challenged in life to see if you’re truly ready for ultimate victory. It is critical to have determination in order to capture the objective, and fulfill your eventual purpose.

The secret to success is to form superior habits. It will make all the difference in being successful, or failing. Be willing to put the same indomitable spirit into making your dreams come true as you would in facing a life or death situation. Do not wallow in your pity and blame others for your failures. No one wants to listen to a chronic complainer. Live as if you were to die tomorrow.

“It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energ y and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.” – Theodore Roosevelt

The entrepreneur works a one hundred hour week, in order to not have to work forty hours for someone else. We enjoy the fruits of our labor. We want to win at all costs. We have our life to live, and it is our choice to accept the risks of being an entrepreneur. It is not glory that we seek. When the company prospers and we see the final product, and our clients are ecstatic with a job well done, that is what we live for. The f reedom to make our decisions right or wrong is the freedom that our country gives us. But there are times when it is not an easy road, when the accounts receivables grows beyond our control, when the government continues to burden us with excessive intrusion and taxes, when the gas prices go through the roof, and we still have to make payroll and persevere. At this point, it is determination and faith that help us to survive and then thrive. The strong will endure, the diligent will flourish, those of faith will see miracles, and those who are determined will triumph over all obstacles.   –Thomas Cronin

Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Mastertapes, Sir Paul McCartney said he had been at a loss when the band fell apart in acrimony in 1970. “It was difficult to know what to do after The Beatles. How do you follow that?” he told John Wilson. “I was depressed. You would be. You were breaking from your lifelong friends. So I took to the bevvies.”

 “The business thing split us apart,” said Sir Paul, adding that all the “heavy meetings” were “doing my head in.” He became so depressed that he did not know “whether I was still going to continue in music.” Eventually, he moved to Scotland – partly to make himself unavailable for the business meetings – and hit the bottle. “It was Linda who said, ‘you’ve got to get it together…’ and that led to Wings.”  –BBC

Gifted Children: personality traits to describe precocious children

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Dakota Fanning

“There’s been two people I’ve met that’s amazed me. One was Angelina Jolie, and the other was Dakota Fanning. I’m convinced this child has the soul of a 40 year old person.” -Denzel Washington, discussing his film Man on Fire  

 

Precocious Children“Getting into everything,” “stubborn” and, sometimes, “a pain in the neck” are just a few of the ways precocious children are described. Many personality traits associated with precocious children stem from their advanced language and reasoning abilities. Unfortunately, this makes it that much harder to trick your toddler into believing that his fish “went swimming” down the toilet or that the hair dryer only works when it’s held by an adult. Understanding these personality traits can make it easier to handle those “memorable” situations.

Empathy

When she was 2 years old, your precocious little one sobbed seeing a bird eating a live worm, and by 5 she’s contemplating a vegan lifestyle. A lot of precocious children decide to become vegetarians. Early on in life, they may develop a heightened awareness of the treatment of animals and may decide they want to become vegans or vegetarians. Precocious kids often have a highly developed sense of morality and emotional understanding, notes Linda Silverman, Ph.D., in “Early Signs of Giftedness.” Such children are often described as sensitive and caring by their classmates and peers, even during situations that would leave her peers unfazed.

Persistence

Precocious children are often dogged in their pursuit of solving a challenge; like that cell phone back you thought was so securely in place. Their ability to think of alternative solutions combined with the desire to learn means precocious children may spend long periods trying to solve a challenging puzzle or building a difficult block tower. This trait may be misinterpreted as being stubborn, given that a precocious child may become so relentless in his pursuits that he resents interruption for other necessary activities.

Creativity

The creativity of a precocious child doesn’t necessarily end with the recent “mural” she drew on the dining room wall. A precocious child often finds several different ways to reach the same end-point, whether it’s solving a shape puzzle or figuring out how to lasso the cookie tin with a dress sash. Her work habits may appear unconventional or non-conforming, which can make her seem uncooperative or uncontrollable since she’s always figuring out new ways to accomplish a task or access prohibited items.

Curiosity

Curiosity can equate to asking “why” every five minutes or wanting to talk about connections he’s making. For example, a precocious toddler listening to a story about a magic scarf might ask lots of questions about how the magic scarf was made, where it came from and the material, rather than simply accepting that the scarf was magical. One-sentence answers rarely satisfy a precocious child’s curiosity, and it can feel overwhelming to keep up with the barrage of questions. As noted in “Education of Gifted and Talented Children,” by Gary Davis et al., it’s important to stimulate his curiosity by searching for the answer together.  –Our Everyday Life